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Thread: Child porn to help media push through Internet filters.

  1. #1

    Child porn to help media push through Internet filters.

    This is an interesting read. How the media companies are using child porn to get people conditioned to accept internet filtering. After we get used to it, then expand the filters to all domains that they want to control. Sounds like China or Iran to me.

    Hollywood, Big Music: We love kiddie porn!

    The strategy explained by Mr. Schlüter worked like clockwork.

    Start with child porn, which everybody agrees is revolting, and find some politicians who want to appear like they are doing something. Never mind that the blocking as such is ridiculously easy to circumvent in less than 10 seconds. The purpose at this stage is only to get the politicians and the general public to accept the principle that censorship in the form of ”filters” is okay. Once that principle has been established, it is easy to extend it to other areas, such as illegal file sharing. And once censorship of the Internet has been accepted in principle, they can start looking at ways to make it more technically difficult to circumvent.

    In Sweden, the copyright lobby tried exactly the same tactic a couple of months after the seminar where Johan Schlüter had been speaking. In July 2007, the Swedish police was planning to add The Pirate Bay to the Swedish list of alleged child pornography sites, that are blocked by most major Swedish ISPs.

    The police made no attempt whatsoever at contacting anybody from The Pirate Bay, which they of course should have done if they had actually found any links to illegal pictures of sexual child abuse. The plan was to just censor the site, and at the same time create a guilt-by-association link between file sharing and child porn.

    In the Swedish case, the plan backfired when the updated censorship list leaked before it was put into effect. After an uproar in the bloggosphere, the Swedish police was eventually forced to back down from the claim that they had found illegal child abuse pictures, or had any other legal basis for censoring the file sharing site. Unlike in Denmark, The Pirate Bay is not censored in Sweden today.

    But the copyright lobby never gives up. If they are unable to get what they want on the national level, they will try through the EU, and vice versa.

    The big film and record companies want censorship of the net, and they are perfectly willing to cynically use child porn as an excuse to get it. All they needed was a politician who was prepared to do their bidding, without spending too much effort on checking facts, or reflecting on the wisdom of introducing censorship on the net.

    Unfortunately they found one in the newly appointed Swedish EU commissioner Cecilia Malmström. In March 2010 she presented an EU directive to introduce filtering of the net, exactly along to the lines that Johan Schlüter was advocating in his speech at the seminar in 2007.

    I assume that commissioner Malmströms’s motives are honourable, and that she genuinely believes she is doing something good that will prevent sexual child abuse. But sweeping a problem under the carpet, or hiding it behind filters, can never be the proper solution. If there actually are sites distributing pictures of sexual child abuse openly on the net, the sites should be shut down and the people behind them should be put in prison (after a proper trial).

    But Cecilia Malmström‘s Internet censorship directive will have no effect at all on sexual child abuse in the world. All she will have achieved if she is successful with this directive, will be to legitimize the principle of Internet censorship in Europe, just like the copyright lobby wanted her to.

    It would be very sad if she succeeds.


    It is an old saying but "Censorship is a slippery slope."

    The idea of filters will allow the media companies to legally block anything that they feel could be used for what they determine is wrong. Most filters are hidden from public review and in many cases, revealing the details can send you to jail. Look at the fight over filters in Australia.

  2. #2
    wow... I thought we are living in a demographic country where the people have equal rights as long as we are not harming others or anything to do with child porn then it should be OK. If they choose to censored everything then we might as well be in prison.
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  3. #3
    I see two big problems with this type of law. One is that censorship simply drives the offenders further underground. Letting them carry on their work, where they are easily monitored, should make detection and prosecution easier. Anyone who puts illegal porn on a web site or file sharing site should have their head examined anyway. That's such an idiotic move, they might as well just show up at a police station with some illegal material and ask to be arrested.

    The other HUGE problem I see is that these laws are a license for anyone with a personal grudge to shut down almost any web site they choose. Simply making a false allegation can result in addition to censorship lists, as has already been shown in Europe. If that does not work, planting some illegal material on a web site or file sharing and then reporting it will achieve the same result. We will end up with thousands of censored sites for no other reason than they ended up on a "hit list" of sites that large corporations want to put out of business. Welcome to the 21st century version of witch hunts folks.
    --Robert

  4. #4
    I agree with the statements above - and, on a related matter, I can't help but be disgruntled by RIM's acceptance to move some Blackberry servers to gulf states where the contents can be monitored by authorities for "illegal activities" ....

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe...rticle1666136/


    In a move that will almost certainly set a precedent for similar negotiations with a host of other countries, BlackBerry-maker Research In Motion (RIM-T54.931.873.52%)appears to have reached an agreement with the government of Saudi Arabia to give local authorities greater monitoring powers over BlackBerry communications.

    The Associated Press reported over the weekend that RIM reached an agreement with the Saudi government. Under the reported terms, which have not been confirmed by the company, RIM would place one or more local servers within Saudi Arabia. Until the specifics of the deal are known, however, it won’t be clear just how much more monitoring access such a move gives Saudi authorities.



    In Iran, after last year's ban on all media communications, Twitter was the only way the West was informed of the mass protest. Now business' are giving in to the totalitarian states and giving more ways to control their population...

    Not a happy day for Canadian advocates of free speech....

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