Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 36

Thread: Does your anti-virus work?

  1. #11
    So out of curiousity, has anyone seen the list and how all the different anti-virus programs rate?
    [url=http://www.DogstarRadio.com/now_playing.php][img]http://images.DogstarRadio.com/now_playing_image2.php/74320871/image.png[/img][/url]

  2. #12

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by dishguy View Post
    But when challenged about security the Linux fan boys say it's very difficult to attack linux because settings need to be manually overridden and it's "Not for the faint of heart".
    So which is it?
    To be fair, he didn't say you had to do what he was doing, just that he chose to.
    Quote Originally Posted by dishguy View Post
    I'll stick with Windows and Mac.
    The Mac I agree with!

    Quote Originally Posted by dishguy View Post
    I need functionality that is easy to access and not built for manual manipulation.
    I think the developer community has a dilemma, The same one that faces any software developer.
    Do I make it useful for the masses or do I keep it secure.
    The two don't go together.
    I don't think it has to be that way. I have been a big fan of Ubuntu in that they have made it pretty darned easy to install. I have to admit I think that they have been focusing too much on the eye-candy and ease of use and have let reliability slip in some cases. You can have both, it just costs more (time and/or resources)

    But I do think that the Mac is the closest to your goals. It's easy to use, reliable and is based on a very secure foundation. It's unfortunate that Apple doesn't allow OS X to be installed on non-Apple equipment. I have neither the time nor the strong desire to go down the Hackintosh route.

    So I'm currently doing the distro-tour in case Ubuntu's Lucid Lynx doesn't measure up. The top candidates are Fedora and failing that, probably Debian.

    I just got a new small Lenovo Thinkpad and the first thing that I did was pull out the drive with Windows 7. The next thing I did was throw in an SSD and installed Linux!

    I'll stick with Linux and Mac!
    Form[B][COLOR="Red"]ER[/COLOR][/B] Bell customer.

  4. #14
    All I can say is I know of a national organization that has been off the net for close to two weeks because of a Virus that cannot be scanned. Users are frustrated. Fax machines are getting used quite a bit. Do you remember those things from before the days of email?

    Virus defences are important. Stopping stupid users is also important.

    Windows had gone in the right direction with Windows Vista but backtracked with Windows 7 to "make it easier for users."

    There is a point of knowledge that users need to know before they should be allowed onto the net. Windows doesn't have that requirement. I have seen a 13 year old install, setup and run a Linus install on a laptop. That means it is easy enough for most people. Okay, there are many that still cannot set the clocks if they are digital.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by dishguy View Post
    You know this is all very frustrating.
    When I say that Linux is a pain in the ass to use and it needs to be worked to hard to do things I can easily do on a pc, I get slammed and told I am full of it and new distros are as easy to use as a bread knife.
    On Windows, the problem is what is easy is also easy to attack. On Linux I can install and use software. Share files. Setup and run a media server. All from the GUI. The only hard thing I have run into is per user encryption. This needs to be easier and needs a GUI. I of course have to enter a password to do all of these administration services.

    But when challenged about security the Linux fan boys say it's very difficult to attack linux because settings need to be manually overridden and it's "Not for the faint of heart".
    So which is it?
    Easy as pie or tough as nails?
    You confuse two issues between the two domains. Security is locked down and there are settings that need to be changed in order to run some software and services. Depending on the level, this is down to the files in the various directories. Like Active Directory on Windows can be set up for fine grain Access Control.

    Many Linux machines do this by default. Even on install and first boot, you have to setup a non-admin user. Root, the administrator on many systems cannot use a GUI interface to prevent the tend to login as root by default.

    Windows Vista had the user notification about trying to run something that you shouldn't and that was a good start. In the Linux world, you have to actually get authorization before you can even think of running many applications.

    For an attack to work, you have to actually know how the particular system is setup and configured. One example. Attack through Joe_Blow's account and you have access to Joe_Blow's directory. You cannot just go out and run services or go out set ports without gaining root access and opening these ports.

    There are so many examples to look at.
    I'll stick with Windows and Mac.
    I need functionality that is easy to access and not built for manual manipulation.
    I think the developer community has a dilemma, The same one that faces any software developer.
    Do I make it useful for the masses or do I keep it secure.
    The two don't go together.
    This is can be true in many cases. I do agree that there are limits and that is the problem. If you don't deal with security, then it will get forced onto you. Some ISP's are looking at blacklisting users that don't keep their machines clean.

    I don't think it is wrong to have users understand and learn some basic security and privacy issues before they get to surf the net. This is the best for all of us. Until they learn these things, I feel it is better to give them a locked down secure system. They want to do more, then they learn the basics.

    Of course if you want the ultimate of locked down, look at the Apple products that are coming out. Fully locked down. Purchase to rent to use.

  6. #16

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by KCXLT View Post
    Good for Microsoft, and it has taken them how long?

    Hopefully Apple will not find themselves in as deep a hole as Microsoft was.
    They have a solid foundation, they just need to keep focused on it.

    If they don't, then it's bye-bye Apple. A shame, but I'm not going to lose sleep over it.
    Form[B][COLOR="Red"]ER[/COLOR][/B] Bell customer.

  8. #18
    Apple is trying a way of controlling software that Microsoft has suggested. Control the world. If you want to run it, we have to approve it.

    Heck, they just changed the EULA and DEV rules for apps as part of this control. And they have killed previously approved apps.

    I don't want to be in that type of world with computing.

    I do agree that MS has improved a lot from two years ago but be careful of some of the FUD.

    Now for them to remove IE from privileged application and then they will be on the correct step.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by MeSat View Post
    Apple is trying a way of controlling software that Microsoft has suggested. Control the world. If you want to run it, we have to approve it.
    That part doesn't thrill me at all. I get what they are doing, I just don't have to buy into it. I don't have an iPhone nor do I plan to buy and iPad. They are too locked down for my liking.

    But given their latest results, I don't think that they are too worried about me right now.
    Form[B][COLOR="Red"]ER[/COLOR][/B] Bell customer.

  10. #20
    The difference between Windows and Linux is the system privileges given to ordinary users. With Linux, I need an administrator password to make changes that will compromise the system. With Windows, that's not required. Windows XP is wide open, it's probably the most insecure 32 bit OS ever sold and a big step back from NT and 2000. Even with Win7 and it's improved security, it's easy for a regular user to defeat the security enhancements with one mouse click or disable them entirely with a few. I'm guessing that most people will disable them because they are annoying when performing simple everyday tasks and totally break some software due to poor implementation. UAC is so badly implemented that it will be disabled by many people. UAC is just a hack to cover up a basically insecure system.
    --Robert

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •