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Thread: Does your anti-virus work?

  1. #1

    Does your anti-virus work?

    Here is a review of anti-virus software for Windows XP. It may be informative to some.

    Third of XP security suites flunk tests

    It may be relevant to Windows 7 anti-virus software as well.

  2. #2
    My Anti Virus is call Linux and it work like a charm!
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  3. #3
    Your "Linux" antivirus works because very few people give a crap about it

    Kryspy
    1) Samsung PN50B530 Plasma, Shaw Direct DVR-630,PS3 Slim, Pioneer VSX-815 7.1, Harmony 880
    2) Toshiba 32AV500 720p LCD, Shaw Direct DVR-530, WDTV HD Live, Harmony 700

  4. #4
    Exactly. People who make viruses want to cause the most damage possible thats why they target the most popular OS, which is Windows
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  5. #5
    They also want to target the most naive PC users which, as a group, are Windows users. People who use Linux tend to be more technical and aware of things like viruses and other malware. The number of vulnerable PCs out there is staggering. I've heard estimates that there are millions of Windows PCs running bots and root kits. Some of them are used for sending spam and other are just waiting to be activated for other tasks such as denial of service attacks or even espionage tasks.

    As to the effectiveness of AV products, there are always threats that are not caught. There are thousands of exploits on record but not all of them are a current threat. A good AV product will detect those that are currently being circulated and are a threat against a supported, well patched system. IMHO, testing against a virus that was fixed with a security patch or that is so obsolete it poses no risk is a waste of resources.

    Stability is an issue. I've seen a number of products and product updates that were a worse threat than the threats they are supposed to protect from. BitDefender (also packaged in other security products) recently released an update that crippled users systems by quarantining or deleting every accessed executable on the system. I was hit by that and similar things with other virus and firewall products.
    --Robert

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Kryspy View Post
    Your "Linux" antivirus works because very few people give a crap about it

    Kryspy
    Except Google, IBM, NASA, NSA, ...

    Should I go into Governments and cities?

    As said, they go for the low hanging fruit. Those that don't know better. Those that don't even know what a Virus is.

    Search for Ghostnet and how it has hit governments around the world through Windows holes.

    Even the anti-Linux people are probably using Linux in some device they own but just don't know it.

  7. #7
    MeSat,

    I am very much aware of where Linux is used and to what degree. My statement merely was stating that should Linux become as big as Windows hackers and virus makers alike will focus in findng vulnerabilities.

    Thinking this isn't possible would make you a "Windows Minded" individual and you wouldn't want that

    Even more dangerous and foolish are people who jump on the Linux band wagon all willy nilly with no concept of security whatsoever and just trust their PC's whole heartedly to Linux.

    Kryspy
    1) Samsung PN50B530 Plasma, Shaw Direct DVR-630,PS3 Slim, Pioneer VSX-815 7.1, Harmony 880
    2) Toshiba 32AV500 720p LCD, Shaw Direct DVR-530, WDTV HD Live, Harmony 700

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Kryspy View Post
    MeSat,
    Even more dangerous and foolish are people who jump on the Linux band wagon all willy nilly with no concept of security whatsoever and just trust their PC's whole heartedly to Linux.

    Kryspy
    Personally, I trust the open source community to deal with security issues much more than I trust the folks at Microsoft.
    Form[B][COLOR="Red"]ER[/COLOR][/B] Bell customer.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Kryspy View Post
    Even more dangerous and foolish are people who jump on the Linux band wagon all willy nilly with no concept of security whatsoever and just trust their PC's whole heartedly to Linux.

    Kryspy
    But that is the point. The design of Linux over Windows is to minimize the attack vectors by not trying to do everything by default.

    Fedora developers got slammed when they made a change to the package manager that didn't require the root password to install applications. It was fixed within hours of the first bug report. Same with SELINUX, it can stop many non-authorized actions. In fact, it can be a pain for someone that hasn't taken the time to learn it and wants to customize their machine.

    Closed ports and isolated actions, things that Windows is just starting to use have been the basis of Linux since my first experience in 1994.

    There are attacks on Linux systems and some are successful but most fizzle out because they are so hard to spread.

    By default, I have to open ports and enable services to operate some of the things I do. Not for the faint of heart. Not what an average user would even think of doing.

    Your point is made.

  10. #10
    dishguy
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by MeSat View Post
    But that is the point. The design of Linux over Windows is to minimize the attack vectors by not trying to do everything by default.

    Fedora developers got slammed when they made a change to the package manager that didn't require the root password to install applications. It was fixed within hours of the first bug report. Same with SELINUX, it can stop many non-authorized actions. In fact, it can be a pain for someone that hasn't taken the time to learn it and wants to customize their machine.

    Closed ports and isolated actions, things that Windows is just starting to use have been the basis of Linux since my first experience in 1994.

    There are attacks on Linux systems and some are successful but most fizzle out because they are so hard to spread.

    By default, I have to open ports and enable services to operate some of the things I do. Not for the faint of heart. Not what an average user would even think of doing.

    Your point is made.
    You know this is all very frustrating.
    When I say that Linux is a pain in the ass to use and it needs to be worked to hard to do things I can easily do on a pc, I get slammed and told I am full of it and new distros are as easy to use as a bread knife.

    But when challenged about security the Linux fan boys say it's very difficult to attack linux because settings need to be manually overridden and it's "Not for the faint of heart".
    So which is it?
    Easy as pie or tough as nails?

    I'll stick with Windows and Mac.
    I need functionality that is easy to access and not built for manual manipulation.
    I think the developer community has a dilemma, The same one that faces any software developer.
    Do I make it useful for the masses or do I keep it secure.
    The two don't go together.

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