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Thread: Pros and Cons of buying Theatre equipment in the U.S.?

  1. #1
    dishfish2005
    Guest

    Pros and Cons of buying Theatre equipment in the U.S.?

    Well, with the Canadian dollar flying higher than ever, I've been giving thoughts to picking up some equipment from the U.S. Is this a good idea?

    Pros:
    -it is typically cheaper (on a 50" Panny Plasma hundreds less) even with the small exchange factored in, plus less tax.
    -it is cheaper
    -it is cheaper


    Cons:
    -I assume warranty only valid in U.S.
    -Not sure what the duties would be at the border (Couldn't find anything on RevCan site)
    -an hour away from service at the store


    I am a little hesitant to make the big purchase stateside, but may dip my toe with a 20-26" LCD.

    I do wonder when Canadians will stop getting hosed on prices of electronics when they come from the same factory, yet we pay a premium given our strong currency.

  2. #2
    MikeAlex is a good person to ask on this board about buying electronics from the US.

    If I remember correctly, he purchases a lot of camera equipment from New York(?) and said he only has to pay the GST most of the time.

    Mike if you read this, is this correct?
    ....

  3. #3
    GST and PST are collected at the border. You may also have to pay state taxes, kind of a double whammy. There are small duties left on a few products. IIRC, that applies to some large screen TVs. Most Canadian distributors do not honour warranties on products purchased in the US but some do. OTOH, if you are close to the border and can save over 30% (quite common these days) it might be worthwhile. It's always wise to shop around for the best prices in Canada first. Some retailers match US prices fairly closely even if the MSRP is high.
    --Robert

  4. #4
    The local news dove into this one lately when people started complaining about why the price of a car was still thousands less in the US then up here.

    The car companies responded by saying that we have different safety features and options on cars up here. And that was supposed to explain the price difference.???

    We are getting ripped off.

    G

  5. #5
    It is true that US and Canadian cars have different safety requirements/features. What is a $50 item to upgrade or install at the assembly plant might cost $5000 to retrofit after the fact. I've heard of US cars that needed the seats replaced to meet Canadian standards. People are buying cars in the US and bringing them to Canada so there must be some US market cars that need no changes or only minor alterations for the Canadian market.

    As to importing electronics, I believe that UL certification on electronics imports is considered to be equivalent to CSA for Canada.
    --Robert

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Gravity View Post
    The local news dove into this one lately when people started complaining about why the price of a car was still thousands less in the US then up here.

    The car companies responded by saying that we have different safety features and options on cars up here. And that was supposed to explain the price difference.?
    Oh yeah, the DRL requirement. Took a 10 minute drive, hook up to the computer, change a setting to turn them on on my wife's Grand Caravan.
    Took a 5 dollar relay to turn them on on my Contour.

    The U.S. manufactorers make the cars so that they meet standards for U.S. and Canada, they then turn off the ones that the U.S. doesn't require and Canada does (ie. DRL's).

  7. #7
    Yup, what I_Want_My_HDTV said. I paid too much for my Nikon camera in Canada.

    You mentioned home theater equipment. If it is portable enough for you then check out internet pricing at US companies or take a drive, if close enough. Logistics are concern for both purchase and warranty. The closer you are to the US store / repair depot, the easier.

    I bought a radial arm saw at Sears Watertown and got it into my car. Most goods made in the USA are duty free. Some stuff made elsewhere (what isn't ?) is treated by Canada customs as if it was manufactured in the USA so they don't have to look it up. Usually they just ask where you bought the item.

    Check the Canadian government website concerning tariffs. I would look at the winzipped Microsoft Access file or PDF file for you, but I only have dial-up and would take me years to download

  8. #8
    dishfish2005
    Guest
    Thanks everyone for your replies. I've bookmarked the tariffs link to read when I have a little more time...fortunately I finally got cable internet so the novel opens quickly

    Thinking of vacationing stateside in August so will get $400 exemption for 48 hours away so that should cover an LCD moniter and I'll have one of the kids declare for a small LCD TV. We'll see how that goes then make a decision on the big screen in time for football.

    Saw article today on globeinvestor.com that bookseleers and publishers just met to discuss lowering the Canadian retail on books a whopping 5% so that they are priced "only" 20% higher than the US...guess they call us hosers for a reason.

    http://globeinvestor.com/servlet/sto...s0710/GIStory/

    Coincidentally there is also an article on US vs Canadian car prices

    http://globeinvestor.com/servlet/sto...TOS10/GIStory/

  9. #9

    Question

    The last paragraph in the book story is interesting.According to this statement every book seller in the country is breaking Canadian law.The exchange rate now is only 5% + the 10% maximum difference allowed is much less than the current 25% that they are currently charging.Our laws have a lot of bite.

  10. #10
    dishguy
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by bmiller View Post
    The last paragraph in the book story is interesting.According to this statement every book seller in the country is breaking Canadian law.The exchange rate now is only 5% + the 10% maximum difference allowed is much less than the current 25% that they are currently charging.Our laws have a lot of bite.
    The new Harry Potter is due out July 21st.
    It will be telling if it goes over that 10% difference.

    The catch in that article is that the law applies to distributors not retailers.
    For all we know the difference is only 10% at the distribution level and the reatailers are pocketing the additional 10-20% at the retail level.

    Not saying that is the case but it isn't very clear in the article who is making the additional money on these books.

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